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Author Topic: Tallow Tree removal?  (Read 865 times)
Circle C
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« on: May 17, 2012, 09:41:45 am »

I've got a 44 acre block of land that is almost solid tallow trees. Most of the trees are 2-3" diameter,6-8' tall, and dense to the point it's hard to walk through.

What's the best way to go about removing them?

I've thought about running a batwing and shredding the field, then coming back after the new growth with an herbicide.

It's so dense in there, that I don't think a spot treatment herbicide will work.   However, I have another 60 acres next door that has random tallows, and I'd like to spot treat that pasture.


Any recommendations on technique or chemicals used?
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« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2012, 09:47:57 am »

On spot treatment, you can take a cordless drill and drill a hold at the base and squirt some liquid into it.  It's called "2-4-D". You have to have a pesticide license to buy it here in LA, but it works wonders and the process is extremely fast once you get going. 

As far as a huge tract, I've never had any success with killing them all. We've tried the shred the place but ended up having to go behind with the 2-4-D and spot treat the place.  I hate tallow trees.
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2012, 12:13:30 pm »

cut them down and then as ba-iv said, go behind and spray with 2-4d. i know tsc requies the license to buy it here in temple, so its probably the same all over. once completely dead, burn the stumps out. might want to have the volunteer FD on standby, being its 40ac.  Grin
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2012, 12:36:16 pm »

I have used 2-4-d as well and it works...it is fairly priced and I hand someone buy me a couple of gallons because without a liscence you can only buy a quart or 2 at a time...2-4-d targets broad leef plants and trees but you must drench the whole plant for it to work best...I mix remedy with it which kills everything and is quite expensive...

I also have mowed 2 or 3 acres that was mostly 2-3 inch chinese tallows and then mowed them again when about 2 feet tall and after about 1 year they didn't grow back...the bugs will eat the timber after you mow...I just picked up the larger pieces and burned them...
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« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2012, 12:37:13 pm »

A dozer with a good root rake Wink
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2012, 12:49:03 pm »

Talked to someone today and they said clear it and then go behind it and apart "Clear Cast".  I don't know much about it, but they claim great results out of it.
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2012, 12:52:04 pm »

Peachy has the right idear!

Spray later but the roots are so extensive I would start there and then spot treat later if small ones come up.
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« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2012, 12:57:04 pm »

The best way I know is to pluck them with a backhoe or trackhoe. Follow up with a boom spray herbicide for a couple years.
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« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2012, 12:58:58 pm »

Anyone used Grazon P+D  along with Tordon 22K ?


Quote
Chinese Tallowtree
        Chinese Tallowtree

 
Description: Chinese tallowtree (popcorn tree) is a rapid growing, non-native deciduous tree reaching a height of 20–50 feet at maturity. Introduced from China as an ornamental, it has since spread to all coastal states from North Carolina to Texas, and into Arkansas, Oklahoma and surrounding states.

Leaves: Light-green alternate leaves, about as wide as they are long, tapering to a point, which become yellow to red in the fall.

Flowers: Stalked white flowers mature into three-lobed fruit, which resemble popcorn when they split open in the fall to reveal white seed.

Treatment:


Broadcast. Elimination of Chinese tallowtree requires follow-up treatments for two to three years following the initial herbicide treatment. Re-check treated areas each year and promptly control new sprouts or seedings.

Apply 1 gallon of Grazon® P+D herbicide per acre. For best results, it is important to achieve thorough and uniform spray coverage. Use higher spray volumes (20–25 gallons per acre for ground equipment and 10–15 gallons per acre for aerial equipment). Use a non-ionic surfactant or oil-water emulsion to help achieve uniform coverage.

Apply 1 quart of Tordon® 22K herbicide per acre. Use higher spray volumes and an approved agricultural surfactant to ensure thorough, uniform spray coverage.

High-Volume Foliar. For small patches of encroaching Chinese tallowtree or individual plants, use the labeled rate of a 1 percent solution (1 gallon of Grazon P+D per 100 gallons of spray) according to the label. For the best control, spray to thoroughly wet the foliage and stems. To minimize spray drift and achieve good coverage, use the lowest possible pressure and coarse spray.

Apply the labeled rate of 2 quarts of Tordon 22K per 100 gallons of spray mix.


Treatment Timing: Apply in spring or fall when conditions are favorable for plant growth. Thorough and uniform spray coverage is required. Use a spray volume of 20–25 gallons per acre for ground or 5 of more gallons per acre for aerial equipment.
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« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2012, 01:02:48 pm »

Somewhere I read that the Grazon P+D claims a 76-100% root kill with a foliar treatment...


I sure don't want to hire a dozer and root rake on this place.


To add to the above,   This is a 100 acre "free lease" for cattle.  I'd pay about a grand a year in this area to lease 100 acres, and I have been given 3 years.   With that in mind, I don't want to exceed about $3,000.00 to deal with the tallows.
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« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2012, 01:06:57 pm »

Somewhere I read that the Grazon P+D claims a 76-100% root kill with a foliar treatment...


I sure don't want to hire a dozer and root rake on this place.


To add to the above,   This is a 100 acre "free lease" for cattle.  I'd pay about a grand a year in this area to lease 100 acres, and I have been given 3 years.   With that in mind, I don't want to exceed about $3,000.00 to deal with the tallows.

mow em down...run the cattle and spot treat when they sprout...this will ensure the minimum usage/expense on chemicals...and will be the easiest way to do it...the least expensive unless the mower breaks down...
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« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2012, 01:23:16 pm »

I use to work for a man that did brush control we used several methods 1is 50/50 mix of diesel and water 1 1/4 gal of remedy  and 1/2 gallon of tordon 22k (now this is mixed in a 400 gallon tank so you'd have to scale it down ) this mix is for a basel treatment spray all the way around base of tree till it puddles your done the other method is a 1% mix roughly 1/2 cup remedy per 1gallon diesel just cut the tree down and spray the fresh  cut with the mix and be sure to get all stumps because the one you miss will come back and has to be a fresh cut with in an hr of cutting or the tree will seal itself off and it won't work   hope that helps you out oh and you don't need a aplicators license to buy remedy
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« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2012, 01:27:54 pm »

I've got a 44 acre block of land that is almost solid tallow trees. Most of the trees are 2-3" diameter,6-8' tall, and dense to the point it's hard to walk through.

What's the best way to go about removing them?

I've thought about running a batwing and shredding the field, then coming back after the new growth with an herbicide.

It's so dense in there, that I don't think a spot treatment herbicide will work.   However, I have another 60 acres next door that has random tallows, and I'd like to spot treat that pasture.


Any recommendations on technique or chemicals used?


Our neighbor just had the same problem. He brush hogged it and then turned the ground with a moore boy plow.

As far as chemicals that work, my father n law works for the drainage district and they use grazon mixed with remedy and it works well.
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« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2012, 01:42:17 pm »

circle c if you can get products that are for licensed herbacides . the best product for killing trees is called   GARLON - 4 . I USED TO BE A TREE BUTCHER FOR THE UTILITIE COMPANY'S LOL and that is the product we used to clear transmission lines and spot spray problem areas . you can or need to mix with diesle or a light weight hydrolic oil and just spray a 12'' area on the trunk and the following year you can walk through and push them over by hand . this product will kill a hundred year old stand of bois-darc and would have no problem on tallow . the root system will desinagrate below the surface allowing you to just pull up six and eight inch trees by hand lol . just find a tree crew in your area that is doing line clearance [ electrical ] and they should be able to tell you all about it .
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« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2012, 01:43:47 pm »

Tordon is great kills them fast i just mix it and spray the base of the tree it will kill any size tree good stuff
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« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2012, 01:49:00 pm »

If the trees are just 2 to 3 inches mow em down with a bib bush hog as needed. Probably the cheapest route. I've seen farmers where I'm from reclaim pastures with them big bush hogs that I would never have thought possible. Also there is an attachment that goes on a
Bobcat that will shred them exact size trees you are talking about. I was told the name of the attachment but I don't remember. It works
like a champ.  
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« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2012, 02:24:17 pm »

Somewhere I read that the Grazon P+D claims a 76-100% root kill with a foliar treatment...

The key to that is foliar. If you shred it you will have to let it leaf back out before you spray.

Look up Grazon Next. That is what we use annually for huisatche, mesquite, and weed control.

Find the local contractors in that area with the buggies to fertilize and spray. They should know what kills them. There are probably others in that area who fight them also.
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« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2012, 03:25:54 pm »

Somewhere I read that the Grazon P+D claims a 76-100% root kill with a foliar treatment...

The key to that is foliar. If you shred it you will have to let it leaf back out before you spray.

Look up Grazon Next. That is what we use annually for huisatche, mesquite, and weed control.

Find the local contractors in that area with the buggies to fertilize and spray. They should know what kills them. There are probably others in that area who fight them also.

Due to the density of the trees and the height, I don't think I can get to the trunks.  Figuring foliar will be the best route, I planned to shred the place with a 15' batwing, then in a few months, when the new growth bushes out, I was planning to go after it with a pasture sprayer.


Thanks for all the replies so far.

I'll do some reading on the other chemicals that have been mentioned.
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« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2012, 08:13:01 pm »

its almost impossible to get rid of one every little seed that falls on the ground is another one
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« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2012, 08:45:15 pm »

Bunch of goats. That's the only animal I've ever saw eat them.
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