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Author Topic: Solo strike dogs  (Read 703 times)
joshg223
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« on: October 10, 2018, 04:46:31 pm »

How many of you have a dog that you can take to the woods solo and rely on that dog to find and bay hogs?  My question comes because I have several really honest hard hunting dogs that consistently produce hogs but when tasked hunting by their selves they do not hunt and range nearly as far and that is a pet peeve of mine. In my 17-18 yrs of hunting I’ve only owned 1 that would do it.  I can take 2 of my dogs and catch hogs all I want but just hunt one and my odds dramatically decrease. We as hog hunters very rarely hunt one dog so most don’t know if they have a dog that can do it. It’s hard to believe out of the handful of good dogs I’ve owned that they are-were all ME-TOO dogs.


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cajunl
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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 07:13:26 pm »

I will not keep a dog past 2 that will not find, stop and bay a hog solo. Every litter of pups that is the goal. Are some better at it...yes. But they all can and will do it solo. I hunt one dog and a catch dog especially when i hunt solo. i find the more I hunt only one dog the better the hog catching % goes up. 2 dogs is generally they most EVER turned out at a time.
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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 07:41:24 pm »

This is something I have thought about several times. I think a lot of times we create this more so than it being the dogs natural way. I think it's done by only hunting them one way, with other dogs. I believe like cajun, put them in the role you expect them to play. If you hunt them as pack dogs they will be pack dogs. If you hunt them solo, they will be solo dogs and pack dogs when paired up. I tell my hunting friend all the time, when they have a young dog that definitely knows what they are doing and has confidence, to start putting them on the ground first and alone and give them the opportunity to do it by themselves. Because I don't hunt as much as I'd like, I'll take 2 or 3 dogs. But I don't have to turn them all out at once. I can usually try to make it harder and harder for the young dog each time so he learns and gains confidence each time. If they try but struggle too hard, I will cast the other dog before they decide to give up on it. Often times they are settled down and paying good attention by then and learn from the older dogs. Soon they can do it solo or with help. Many times my dogs cover lots of ground because they hunt out different areas even though they are on the ground with other dogs. Sometimes that's good and sometimes it's a lot of work getting to 2 or 3 different bays at once.
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Reuben
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2018, 08:01:27 pm »

Years ago all my dogs were great alone but I tested all pups and turned them out alone just to see what was in their nature...every dog I bred was tested to range, strike, and stick with a hog...no training to speak of because the goal was for identifying and keeping pups born with "natural born" ability...

I now hunt a new pack of dogs and I do not have my own places to hunt...my dogs do not do well alone because i  cast them together...when i cast one alone it will wait on company most of the time...sometimes they will go alone...most of these issues are caused by how i hunt them now...i can mix or match any two dogs and they will leave out quickly and they will find one pretty quick close by or a long ways off if needed...
Sometimes i don't cast them because my buddies dogs won't go to mine if they strike too far...so i keep mine tied back and wait for his to strike and then i cut mine loose...if his dogs don't strike i will cast mine at that time...i am about to get a big place and I will then hunt my dogs a different way...the way the dogs hunt has a lot to do with how we hunt them...I am talking about dogs that hunt...dogs that hunt can be molded to hunt in various ways...

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joshg223
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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2018, 08:16:40 pm »

Well I’m just wondering if it’s me. I want my dogs to be independent but if I culled on that I feel like I’d never have anything to hunt. Considering the dogs that I hunt I think if I handled them differently I could have gotten better results from them hunting solo but at the same time I feel like I give and have giving them more opportunities than most dogs get. Can’t help but to think I’m missing something.


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t-dog
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2018, 09:48:38 pm »

Many years ago I was given a young dog out of the Doebelly stuff. He had everything I desired in a hog dog. I had a dog at the time that everything on my yard goes back to at the time, a once in a lifetime dog. I hunted those 2 together for probably 3 years. Then my older dog got cut up pretty good and I took the other dog solo. I saw a track and could tell he was smelling it but wouldn't leave on it. He run it 150 yards or so and stop and wait on me. I couldn't get him to finish it for nothing. It made me so mad that I came home and called my buddy and told him that if he wanted him to come get him or I was gonna cull him another way. Of course he  came and got him. With my old dog,  he was a go hunting, hair pulling, stay put son of a gun. My buddy got him and started hunting him as a lead dog and in a few months he was top notch, doing it alone or with help. I say this to say be patient. He wasn't a puppy when this happened.
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« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 06:26:36 am »

When I start puppies after 5 or 6 times of them going hunting and they are going with older dogs making races and baying good I start turning em loose by thereself and let them figure it out by thereself it can be little aggervating with some and some take right to it fine but in the end I think it makes them better dogs

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bignasty
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« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 05:37:27 am »

I hunt by myself most times with one bay dog out hunting and a catch dog with me on a leash.been doing it like this for 30 plus years. I put them down if they don't hunt and produce solo by 2,I start them later then most tho around 1 yr old because I know the need to be physically and mentally mature enough to hunt for 3 to 4 hours.
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Judge peel
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« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2018, 12:05:51 pm »

Lot of different levels to a dog I don’t really care for those get gone dogs. Now hunting on its own is kinda must if your going to hunt it. But the range of a dog always increased with a running buddy cuz there pack animals. To many dogs and you get a me to feel. I seen it done with one dog and 20 dogs. How far out a dog is only says how far away it is from you. No wrong way here only what you expect and what your willing to accept


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t-dog
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« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2018, 02:12:32 pm »

Big nasty I'm totally in agreement with you on the 1yr old thing. I do a lot of mock hunts but no  uncontrolled situations until a year old. Just because they can run with the big dogs doesn't mean they are mentally mature enough to handle whatever is thrown at them. I  had a young dog one time that was really doing good. I wound up losing him 2 or 3 times for a day or 2. This was before I had a tracking system. It pretty much ruined him. After the third loss he wouldn't hunt. I gave him.lots of time but he never recovered. If I had allowed him to mature mentally, I would probably have had a heck of a dog.
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Goose87
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« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2018, 07:20:47 pm »

I refuse to feed a dog that does not have the capabilities of being a one out solo dog, but some of them just make it look easier than others and are just flat out better than others...




This particular female is one of those dogs that doesn’t come around a dog mans life very often, you can just about drop her anywhere at anytime of day or year and she’s going to put you on a hog if there’s any around, if she catches the slightest scent she is going to try her damndest to grub it out, she’s pretty smart and has developed a “hog sense”, for lack of better words after taking some cuttings in her younger years, if the area is conducive to this style of hunting I’ll get her started on a track and go on about hunting the other dogs, I’ll keep tabs on her in the Garmin and once it shows her sitting down in an area for a length of time and making small circles around a certain spot I’ll slip to her and she will not be saying a word until she can hear or smell me coming in or killing the truck or buggy, or I send her some help, once she has a good hog settled she’ll leave him alone and put no pressure on him, to some this may be a cull factor but something I can live with with the number of good hogs she’s produced solo, if she’s got help she will bay but not one of them barking every minute lighting the woods up kinda bays, she’s the best dog I’ve ever owned and one of the best I’ve ever hunted behind as well, she’s exceptionally nice and the stars were aligned or something when we came into each other lives, she’s the main foundation which I’m currently breeding around, and eventually everything on my yard will go back to her, I have several nice daughters off her that are nice dogs themselves...
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Goose87
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« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2018, 08:48:46 pm »



The yella looking dog is my Shiloh female, she is 3/4 BMC and 1/4 Black and Tan hound, and around 7 years old, her and little girl pictured above are the same age and have been hunted together most of their lives and have produced many pounds of pork, she’s a little more peculiar of a dog than little girl, she’s come out of it a good bit in her older age but is a real timid and shy dog and doesn’t like strange people, used to wouldn’t hunt worth a lick if there was stranger to her there,that actually got her culled from my yard one time and I give her to some boys I had given some of her litter mates and mother to, all she did was run deer for them, I went and got her back and have purposely put her on deer and she wouldn’t touch it and has been a completely different dog once I got her back home and in the routine and really turned it up after I got her back, maybe she knew the alternative after she was spared once lol, it doesn’t phase her these days but she still will not come all the way out to the truck or rd if she hears anybody but me calling her out, she has a pretty good honing ability and makes her way back to where she was turned out once she’s done if it takes me a while to get to her, most of the time she will make it to a rd or trail and lay out of sight until I eventually come get her, paired up with another dog she will stretch her legs and hunt but by herself I’d label her what some call short-med range, she’s one of my go to dogs for roading in front of the vehicle being as she won’t air out down the rd like it’s the Kentucky derby, and will bay with a ferocity of a lion lol, I swear she has murder in her eyes when she’s baying, and it blows my mind because she is the most timid dog I’ve ever owned, and will not come out of her dog house at all if there’s a stranger there, some of the better dogs myself and some of my hunting buddy’s are currently hunting are off of her and a running walker male, I liked that cross so much that I took little girl back later and bred her to that same male, I only have one set of offspring off of her, I bred her once to a foundation bred BMC and didn’t care for any of them and got rid of them...
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Goose87
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« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2018, 09:41:56 pm »


The black male pictured next to little
Girl is my Smutt male, this is the only picture I have of him on this phone, he’s like a rat on acid had an illicit affair with the energizer bunny, he starts off hunting close and gets wider with each loop if he doesn’t hit a track he can take, he’s a lot like little girl in his determination of working a track out, my biggest complaint about him is if he’s hunting and hits a four wheeler trail or rd you might as well get ready to go get him and get him straightened back out because he going to run down that sucker like seabiscuit and if I sit him up a while he won’t hesitate to bunch up some mama cows or yearlings and do it with some style and is easily called off when I yell him out, if he’s been hunted a good bit and kept run down he won’t mess with them at all, few weeks ago I pulled up to a farmers barn the garmin was showing him at and my heart sank when I seen all the goats and kids running around thinking I was about to have to pay for some
baby goats but he was just laid down under their feeder in the shade, another thing that aggravated me is a lot my fault for not keeping him in shape like he should be but if it’s hot weather and he gets hot he will lay down wherever he’s at and I have to go in and get him, or come back and get him, I normally don’t leave him if I see he’s done that on the garmin especially don’t during hot weather, I think he has a genetic predisposition to get worked up and over heat because he will do it in the box and be panting like crazy and hasn’t even made a step yet and has been that way since he was a pup, I had his littermate brother I started hunting at the same time and he was just to wound up, his teeth would be chattering just sitting in the pen and when ever casted he would just make a straight line and run as hard and as fast as he could, I left him in the cow pack and hunted Smutt, he’s one of the only hog dogs I’ve ever owned that will literally run into a wall of briars just hunting, out of the 3 I’ve posted he’s probably got the most range of them and probably tries the hardest of any dog I got but doesn’t come up with a hog as consistently as the other two, he’s Little Girls 2nd and 3rd cousin on his paternal side, and her 3rd and like 5th or so on his maternal side and I’ve raised a litter off them two and got 3 to weaning after a bulldog killed my pick and I had already given my word to the other guys about the others, I sent my ex father in law one being as he’s the one who put me in these dogs, I sent the boy who owned Smutts sire one that got killed as a pup and I give Billy’s step son one that has been the definition of a solo dog since she was about 6 months old, from the first time she was messed with she has been a firecracker, I was constantly getting on to the young man that raised her from a pup because she was just a little thing when he started messing with her and taking her to the woods and running her with the grown dogs day after day and I’m convinced stunted her growth, I skipped little girls last heat but and going to cross her to Smutt again after the success of the first time making that cross...


I have several more dogs that I’m hunting more than these 3 older dogs now that are nice dogs themselves but haven’t built my confidence up enough yet to brag a little on them, I have a female that’s out of Little Girl and Smutts grandpa that has her days where she looks just as nice as her mother and days where she just can’t seem to pull it off but has more good days than bad, once I prove out the cross of Little Girl and the running walker male and I’m going to breed one of those females back to Smutt and another back to Little Girls half brother/1st cousin, but all that’s at least another year out at a minimum, sorry for the ramblings, I’m bored tonight and it ain’t no secret I love talking about dogs...
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joshg223
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2018, 09:45:01 pm »

Well my dogs are gonna leave on a track if they come across one. They just don’t hunt nearly as deep by theirselves.  They go up to a mile hunting with each other but solo hunt 100-250 yards. I just can’t help to think I’m doing something that causes it. But they will still run and bay one solo all day long. Just have to cast on better sign.


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Goose87
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« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2018, 10:18:14 pm »

Well my dogs are gonna leave on a track if they come across one. They just don’t hunt nearly as deep by theirselves.  They go up to a mile hunting with each other but solo hunt 100-250 yards. I just can’t help to think I’m doing something that causes it. But they will still run and bay one solo all day long. Just have to cast on better sign.


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It might be a little frustrating at first and you may have already tried this, but if you can try bringing just one bay dog period, no other dogs in the box or bike other than the catch dog and hunt them right by themselves until they realize there isn’t any help in the box and none coming anytime soon, a problem I’m seeing with my younger dogs that I didn’t have when I was starting Shiloh and little girl and later Smutt is that one of the areas we hunt a good bit a dog doesn’t have to go far to find a runnable track, a lot of times less than 2 hundred yards out of the box, when we go someplace that there aren’t as many chances to put out on a fresher track or few hogs the dogs don’t want to push out even farther to find one at first because they’ve been conditioned to not have to go as far or try as hard to cut a track...

Sometimes all it takes is to take just a baydog by itself and just go sit in the woods where you know there’s hogs and cast the dog and let them do the figuring out part, Smutts sire was an impressive looking young dog when his owner first started him, but when hunted by himself wouldn’t cast out, so finally his owner pulled up in the woods and collared him and casted him out and got back in his truck to take a nap, the male made a small loop and was back at the truck, little over an hour later he woke up to his garmin updating and it was saying his dog was trees and he could hear him bayed half a mile or so away, after that day it’s like a switch flipped and the dog never had an issue ranging out again, I know we all don’t have the time to go about and try all the things we’re recommended...


Another option is to place a feeder in the woods about 50-100 yards further than what you think your dogs are turning around at and get some hogs coming to it and start casting just one dog at a time in that direction and more than likely genetics and Mother Nature will take over and they will realize they need to go a little farther than what they’ve become comfortable with by themselves...


Do you hunt areas with a decent hog population and a lot of hogs...
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Goose87
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« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2018, 11:12:32 pm »

Big nasty I'm totally in agreement with you on the 1yr old thing. I do a lot of mock hunts but no  uncontrolled situations until a year old. Just because they can run with the big dogs doesn't mean they are mentally mature enough to handle whatever is thrown at them. I  had a young dog one time that was really doing good. I wound up losing him 2 or 3 times for a day or 2. This was before I had a tracking system. It pretty much ruined him. After the third loss he wouldn't hunt. I gave him.lots of time but he never recovered. If I had allowed him to mature mentally, I would probably have had a heck of a dog.


T-Dog folks would have a lot better turn out on their pups if they would read your post and actually apply it to their own dogs, by no means am I saying is this the  case with the original poster or his questions, just because a young dogs is leggy or fast running across the yard doesn’t mean he’s mentally with it, I’ve seen a few exceptions about those young super stars, once I slowed down my lifestyle and ways and hunting became about the dog work instead of catching hogs and taking pictures and I followed the advice John Wick wrote in his book even though my dad had been telling me the exact same thing for years but me being young and knowing it all didn’t think my life long dog hunting father knew what he was talking about, after all rabbit dogs, deer dogs and fox hounds were way different  than my hog dogs lol (or so I thought) and I quit comparing my dogs to ole so and so’s and believing every story I heard all the time about ole boy down the roads dogs doing it at 4 months old and such nonsense, I started having a much higher turn out when I started letting the dogs let me know when they were ready, all dogs are different and I know my dogs and raise nearly all of them from pups and the things and characteristics that I look for in my dogs maybe or more than likely are different from the things you look at and for in your dogs to let you know they are mentally tough enough to handle hog hunting, where I was getting at with all that is I sent a good buddy of mine a pup off my Little Girl female and the running walker male and told him to be patient to not even mess with him to just let him run around and be a pup and mentally mature, well he put him in his wooded baypen and the little pup was doing good so he started hauling him with his grown dogs and got him wrecked by a mean sow and just completely ruined the pup hopefully for the time being, all the rest that I placed out were raised and messed with just as I suggested and now they are a few weeks shy of a year old and all looking really nice, had he been a little more patient he probably would’ve had a nice dog on his hands but made the mistake so many others do and want to rush things...

How much truth and fact there is to it I’m not sure, but if we used the age old adage of a dog aging at 7 years to one human year, then a 6 month old dog has the mental capacity of a 3.5 year old toddler, ask yourselves how many 3.5 year old kids do you see dominating the ball fields, at 7 years old a child is just now starting to really learn a sport, at the dogs 2 year age mark they are mentally equivalent to a teenager, during a child’s teenage years is when most of them discover their athletic talents if they have them to begin with, and from there on out like dogs they should only get better, I know there are a lot of differences in humans and dogs and kids and puppies , but then again there are a lot of similarities that we can use to compare to to get a better understanding of how things work, I know this is a little off topic than what was originally asked and I give my apologies...
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Slim9797
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« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2018, 01:18:51 am »

I have killed more hogs in the last 2 years with 1 dog than I have In the last 5 years with anywhere from 2-6. That’s simply a fact. It’s a mindset I have and as any Mind set, it is either instilled in the dog or it isn’t as far as I’m concerned. The dogs I use and have seen used solo are more stock minded than not. Loose, rough, or somewhere in between, these dogs know how and when to do what they must to make what ever it is they’re looking at, stand. The ones that can’t in my opinion have holes, and any hog worth his salt, can see those holes. That has and will continue to be my opinion on the matter. It was something that derived from necessity. I can’t own 10 dogs, I don’t believe in bulldogs, and I have no interest in hurrying to a bay any more. Bay what you can, catch what you just, and you better have your mind about you when I crawl In There with my rifle, because something is getting culled when I do, be it the hog or something else.


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« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2018, 02:51:54 am »

I have killed more hogs in the last 2 years with 1 dog than I have In the last 5 years with anywhere from 2-6. That’s simply a fact. It’s a mindset I have and as any Mind set, it is either instilled in the dog or it isn’t as far as I’m concerned. The dogs I use and have seen used solo are more stock minded than not. Loose, rough, or somewhere in between, these dogs know how and when to do what they must to make what ever it is they’re looking at, stand. The ones that can’t in my opinion have holes, and any hog worth his salt, can see those holes. That has and will continue to be my opinion on the matter. It was something that derived from necessity. I can’t own 10 dogs, I don’t believe in bulldogs, and I have no interest in hurrying to a bay any more. Bay what you can, catch what you just, and you better have your mind about you when I crawl In There with my rifle, because something is getting culled when I do, be it the hog or something else.


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I’ve caught more big hogs with shorter races by hunting one dog or two loose dogs depending on the dogs, but have caught more numbers by having a pack of dogs, usually 4-5, depends on the situation, we hunt to have fun and enjoy ourselves not to try and meet someone’s idea of a standard or to brag about how it was done, my cur dogs are primarily stock bred dogs that have been used to catch hogs and worked well, I don’t mind a dog putting teeth on a hog to stop him or hold him at  bay or catching smaller hogs but will not own a land shark that goes in and tries every hog that’s bayed without the ass to hold it and breaks bays, I don’t mind a dog that’s rough but commits and catches and does what it takes to hold that hog there even when getting cut up, I don’t have time to be steadily doctoring on dogs because they forgot they were baydogs and caused whatever else is there to get cut trying to help, I had dogs just like that for years, most of the time we didn’t need a bulldog, and I wasn’t worried about breeding dogs and catching hogs a certain style and way, I went through a bunch of dogs of all different types and would do whatever it took to catch a hog, nowadays I enjoy the good dog work and breeding and playing with genetics and prefer to bay and catch, your not going to bay and shoot hogs on about 90% of the places anywhere around me relatively close, with the exception of the river swamp in some places, but on the timber land or any planted pines which is the majority of everything around here it’s entirely to thick and you dang ain’t going to do it at night with the thickness and the pressure that’s put on the hogs, there’s nearly as many hog hunters as there is hogs so the hogs are spooky to begin with, to each his own, there different types of 4x4 trucks and different styles of rope horses, whatever works for you and you like it...
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« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2018, 01:00:19 pm »

If your dogs work to your standards and how you ask them too. I don’t see no problem with it. Plenty ways to skin a cat.


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« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2018, 02:10:17 pm »


This particular female is one of those dogs that doesn’t come around a dog mans life very often, you can just about drop her anywhere at anytime of day or year and she’s going to put you on a hog if there’s any around, if she catches the slightest scent she is going to try her damndest to grub it out, she’s pretty smart and has developed a “hog sense”, for lack of better words after taking some cuttings in her younger years, if the area is conducive to this style of hunting I’ll get her started on a track and go on about hunting the other dogs, I’ll keep tabs on her in the Garmin and once it shows her sitting down in an area for a length of time and making small circles around a certain spot I’ll slip to her and she will not be saying a word until she can hear or smell me coming in or killing the truck or buggy, or I send her some help, once she has a good hog settled she’ll leave him alone and put no pressure on him, to some this may be a cull factor but something I can live with with the number of good hogs she’s produced solo, if she’s got help she will bay but not one of them barking every minute lighting the woods up kinda bays, she’s the best dog I’ve ever owned and one of the best I’ve ever hunted behind as well, she’s exceptionally nice and the stars were aligned or something when we came into each other lives, she’s the main foundation which I’m currently breeding around, and eventually everything on my yard will go back to her, I have several nice daughters off her that are nice dogs themselves...

Goose she is a nice looking female, I haven't had a chance to read the rest of your posts below but how is she bred? You going to breed her to one of your running hound crosses? The more I hunt out here the more I lean toward the hound blood so I am always interested when I see a hound or hound cross.
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