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Author Topic: Why do you hunt the dogs you do?  (Read 650 times)
t-dog
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« on: October 09, 2019, 06:05:12 pm »

I settled with the dogs I have because I couldn't find what I wanted exactly. I got dogs from this person and that person and there were some good ones in them but never a consistency. When I finally found what I was looking for, then I decided the only way I would ever have consistency for my liking was to start raising my own. There were things in the cur types that I did and didn't like and the same with the hounds. I found some of both that were close and that's where I started. Here I am today with dogs that suit me and probably nobody else, but buy their feed. How did you decide what you wanted to hunt?

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Goose87
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« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2019, 09:45:17 pm »

My first pair of pups that had the potential behind them I got bc they were Black and Tan colored cur dogs and I had been enamored 2 yrs or so prior by one that belonged to another hunter that I saw while camping on a hog hunting trip when I was around 13-14 and my dad was taking me with my uncles and paw paw, a local hunter name Frankie Wheat owned a catch dog competition and I used to go work it, he was my old lil league coach and an old rooster friend of my dads, I laid eyes on them pups and knew I had to have them , paw paw had actually got their sire for Frankie 5 yrs  or so prior, one turned out to be the super star of the litter and the other I eventually put down, I was blessed to have had that dog as my first hog dog bc he set the bar high very early for me, i culled a pile of dogs after loosing him bc they weren’t his caliber, still have never owned a dog like him, better yes, but not his personality or character, the Gumbo dog in my other post goes back to him several different ways on his bottom side, after loosing my pack two different times and started over with the pups I had twice I made a grand mistake and decided to start learning all I could about breeding and genetics so I could raise my own, for whatever reason the lord saw fit I never had much luck with anything other than what I raised, even when given more opportunities and time, some I jumped the gun on by listening to “local legends”,
My Shiloh gyp was the result of an accidental breeding that clicked, her mother  was from a litter made to try and get her grand dam to raise a litter of BMC that wasn’t hers, she turned out to be a blessing in disguise and has forever mad her mark on my pack for now on, my stock bred curs came from my ex paw in law who at one time was a well known and respected hog hunter, we sat many nights for hours him telling me stories of their dogs, he hadn’t hunted in nearly 10 years and had all but let what he had if that blood die off, he finally let me take a few that he used on cattle hog hunting and I saw all I needed after a few times, looking back it now seems like divine intervention bc it was around this time I lost my top 3 dogs within a yr, after doing my homework and digging on his dogs ancestry and finding out who else had them and going and seeing those dogs hunt I knew in order to get where I wanted to be I needed to swallow my pride and face the facts that my dogs I had started with just wasn’t even in that league, I didn’t get rid of what I had left but knew in order to up my game I didn’t need to breed them, same time I was just learning the entry level basics of the science of breeding and was given the blessing to do some of my own breedings with the paw in laws dogs, that first litter was really tight bred and they clicked pretty good, I was then given full rights to breed who and how I wanted and made quite a few crosses of that family and selected the ones I liked on hogs and the others were kept on cattle, and went from there, now I have more of that blood in it’s truest form than anybody including the ones that bred them up, who was friends with paw in law, Just about every successful hunter around here has dogs that go back in someway to 2 crosses made by my Pw n Lw and rob Hobgood, and curt dosset, rob had an outstanding gyp that was on her own level but was scared to breed her on account he was afraid she wouldn’t be the same after pups, even in his death bed Mr. Rob regretted never breeding her, they bred her sister to a dosset male and bred her brother to a gyp off that dosset males sire, I’ve bred around and stayed as close to those two crosses and the dogs that made them and the strategy has paid off in a life changing way for me to put it lightly, a way that very few will ever know and understand, are they the best, heck no, but they sure as heck please me and I’m a hard fellow to satisfy, and can hold their own with other good  company, and produce hogs consistently, I won’t say 100% of the time bc they haven’t, but I can’t recall the last time they were turned out and didn’t show hogs at the end, several yrs ago I started looking for the right running walker to breed in, I didn’t rush it and let a few friends I trust know what I was looking for, almost 2 years later a close friend said he had what i needed and wanted, my butter bean gyp, she was wicked fast, salty as the floor at the Morton factory, and bayed just as hard as any cur dog, she was bred for the speed and drive trials and had two litter mates that were deadly dominant in the coyote pen trials around here while they were campaigned, in the meantime I had read a pile on bobcat hunting with hounds and had decided that I needed a running walker bred for cat hunting based on the type of running walker that was successful on cat and the traits that made them successful and started the search there, low and behold what I wanted was right under my nose the entire time, Harold Parker is a well known and respected dog man and cat hunter and used to turn out around 10k head of stocker yearlings every yr, I worked countless yearlings for free for Pw N Lw to get dogs from him and just to show my appreciation for what he did, just so happen most of those yearlings belonged to Harold, he would always try to pay me but I wouldn’t take it, just picking his brain on dogs was payment enough, we had always had an instant friendship from the first time we met bc of our love of hunting in general and cattle, once I realized what he had I called and asked if I could breed my Shiloh gyp to one of his walkers, the resulting litter changed the game for myself and close friends and I will forever have that blood in high dose in my dogs, it’s in the works through some strategical breedings to tie the Shiloh dogs with the stock cur dogs from Pw N Lw together and breed from there, I took the best gyp I’ve ever owned that’s off the stock dog breeding and bred to the same sire as the first cat dog litter, besides what I personally consider a cold nose these two sets of dogs possess nearly everything I want in a hog dog, and with Shiloh being the only dog in the mix not line bred and by using a small handful of close kin dogs I don’t think there’s going to be a problem with a lot of unknown variables popping up in the intended crosses , good lord willing and the creek don’t rise I’m excited about where we’re headed and have found that spark again for what I love after taking a little break from hunting to re evaluate my life after a few curve balls and low blows thrown at me, I let these young boys that are like my little brothers hunt most of my dogs and sent them pups, last year or so and hunted mostly when my son wanted to go, they thought for sure I was getting out and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t ponder the thought, I was just sitting on the bench catching my breathe and now back in the game...
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Cajun
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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2019, 08:11:36 am »

That was a good read Goose and brought up some names I have not thought of in a while. When I first started me and a buddy would take a bulldog and ride down the Levy in the evening and when we would spot hogs we would get on the opposite side of the levey and get straight across from them. We would ease that bulldogs head over and when he saw the hogs we would turn him loose. lol Caught about one hog out of 5 doing that. Was going to shoe a horse for a guy and when he limped out to the barn I asked him what happened. He told me a boar hog got him when him and his Dad were hoghunting. That got my attention and when I was done with his horse, we went over to his Dad's to look at his dogs. They used to work hogs when they had open range just a couple of years before and they still went out trying to catch hogs up. These were Catahoulas but did not look anything like the Catahoulas of today. They were 50-60# slim built dogs that could work all day and not wear out. They used them on cows and hogs. None of the blocky headed Cats you see today. Anyway Sal gave me a young 8 month old leopard male and I named him Dawg. When I first started taking him to the woods he was a ball of fire. He didnt know what he was supposed to be hunting but he sure was hunting something. Got him on his first hog and after that he knew. He could run all day and  started off very catchy. A lot of times we woud have to listen for a hog to squel to know where he was. I had some Plotts that I was trying on hogs and this dog could outlast the Plotts and when they gave out, he would go on and bay the hog.  He stayed 25 hours on a bear in Canada with a couple of Joe Hudsons dogs.
  Anyway, I was hunting with Robert L. Hopgood a good bit and we bred Dawg to his Black Gal female. I kept a couple of females and they were good dogs. They could stick 4-6 hours on a running hog but did not have that all day ability, but good dogs. I bred the Stinger gyp to a cur I called Couger that was a pretty good dog and kept a male that I named Shaq. He was a really nice dog that had it all. The only problem was he could not reproduce himself and to be fair to him we never bred him to dogs of his caliber.
  By then I had some pretty good Plotts and the turnout ratio was so much better, I just stuck with the Plotts and that is where I am today.
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2019, 12:44:28 pm »

That was a good read Goose and brought up some names I have not thought of in a while. When I first started me and a buddy would take a bulldog and ride down the Levy in the evening and when we would spot hogs we would get on the opposite side of the levey and get straight across from them. We would ease that bulldogs head over and when he saw the hogs we would turn him loose. lol Caught about one hog out of 5 doing that. Was going to shoe a horse for a guy and when he limped out to the barn I asked him what happened. He told me a boar hog got him when him and his Dad were hoghunting. That got my attention and when I was done with his horse, we went over to his Dad's to look at his dogs. They used to work hogs when they had open range just a couple of years before and they still went out trying to catch hogs up. These were Catahoulas but did not look anything like the Catahoulas of today. They were 50-60# slim built dogs that could work all day and not wear out. They used them on cows and hogs. None of the blocky headed Cats you see today. Anyway Sal gave me a young 8 month old leopard male and I named him Dawg. When I first started taking him to the woods he was a ball of fire. He didnt know what he was supposed to be hunting but he sure was hunting something. Got him on his first hog and after that he knew. He could run all day and  started off very catchy. A lot of times we woud have to listen for a hog to squel to know where he was. I had some Plotts that I was trying on hogs and this dog could outlast the Plotts and when they gave out, he would go on and bay the hog.  He stayed 25 hours on a bear in Canada with a couple of Joe Hudsons dogs.
  Anyway, I was hunting with Robert L. Hopgood a good bit and we bred Dawg to his Black Gal female. I kept a couple of females and they were good dogs. They could stick 4-6 hours on a running hog but did not have that all day ability, but good dogs. I bred the Stinger gyp to a cur I called Couger that was a pretty good dog and kept a male that I named Shaq. He was a really nice dog that had it all. The only problem was he could not reproduce himself and to be fair to him we never bred him to dogs of his caliber.
  By then I had some pretty good Plotts and the turnout ratio was so much better, I just stuck with the Plotts and that is where I am today.

Mr. Mike, who were those folks, were they the ones you’ve told me about from around Waldheim?
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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2019, 12:44:40 pm »

That was a good read Goose and brought up some names I have not thought of in a while. When I first started me and a buddy would take a bulldog and ride down the Levy in the evening and when we would spot hogs we would get on the opposite side of the levey and get straight across from them. We would ease that bulldogs head over and when he saw the hogs we would turn him loose. lol Caught about one hog out of 5 doing that. Was going to shoe a horse for a guy and when he limped out to the barn I asked him what happened. He told me a boar hog got him when him and his Dad were hoghunting. That got my attention and when I was done with his horse, we went over to his Dad's to look at his dogs. They used to work hogs when they had open range just a couple of years before and they still went out trying to catch hogs up. These were Catahoulas but did not look anything like the Catahoulas of today. They were 50-60# slim built dogs that could work all day and not wear out. They used them on cows and hogs. None of the blocky headed Cats you see today. Anyway Sal gave me a young 8 month old leopard male and I named him Dawg. When I first started taking him to the woods he was a ball of fire. He didnt know what he was supposed to be hunting but he sure was hunting something. Got him on his first hog and after that he knew. He could run all day and  started off very catchy. A lot of times we woud have to listen for a hog to squel to know where he was. I had some Plotts that I was trying on hogs and this dog could outlast the Plotts and when they gave out, he would go on and bay the hog.  He stayed 25 hours on a bear in Canada with a couple of Joe Hudsons dogs.
  Anyway, I was hunting with Robert L. Hopgood a good bit and we bred Dawg to his Black Gal female. I kept a couple of females and they were good dogs. They could stick 4-6 hours on a running hog but did not have that all day ability, but good dogs. I bred the Stinger gyp to a cur I called Couger that was a pretty good dog and kept a male that I named Shaq. He was a really nice dog that had it all. The only problem was he could not reproduce himself and to be fair to him we never bred him to dogs of his caliber.
  By then I had some pretty good Plotts and the turnout ratio was so much better, I just stuck with the Plotts and that is where I am today.

Mr. Mike, who were those folks, were they the ones you’ve told me about from around Waldheim?
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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2019, 02:45:44 pm »

I met Finney Clay once about 20 years ago. Harold got a lot of dogs from him. He was cat hunting with an old guy from south texas. We were hunting the same places then. I wish I knew back then how good his dogs were supposed to be. I would of talked to him more about them! Lol
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« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2019, 05:07:34 pm »

line bred dogs are the scientifically proven way to keep around the style of dogs that suits you.

What suits me? The line of BMCs i run have hunt, and bottom. The most common reason for culling is they are to gritty, I like bay dogs that dont get cut, I dont mind them catching out when they know they can handle it and see us coming but i refuse to run to a bay a mile away bc a strike dog is caught. 
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« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2019, 05:22:27 pm »

Goose, I was talking about Frankie Wheat and Robert Lee Hopgood.  Charlie Gainse and I used to hunt with him a good bit back about 35 years or so. Quick funny story, We were hunting a cornfield with Robert Lee and hogs had been there sometime during the evening before and after about 1/2 hour of the dogs milling around I heard Dawg baying. He must have been about 3/4 of a mile and we went in and caught about a 175# boar. Robert Lee asks me if he thought Dawg had trailed him out of the cornfield and I replied. Well Rob, if it was one of your dogs out there baying and we had fresh hog sign in the field here, dont you think he trailed it out of the cornfield. Rob said point taken. lol He didnt like it tho when someones dogs out did his and he had good dogs. Dawg just had that ability to make good dogs look bad.
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« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2019, 05:44:55 pm »

I met Finney Clay once about 20 years ago. Harold got a lot of dogs from him. He was cat hunting with an old guy from south texas. We were hunting the same places then. I wish I knew back then how good his dogs were supposed to be. I would of talked to him more about them! Lol

Cajun! I have hunted with Harold twice and he showed me a cat each time. First time he came over and we went behind the house and he dumped 1/2 dozen or so running walkers out and I am having mental nightmares about chasing these dogs all over the club. They got ahead of the truck and by the time we roaded them a mile, I knew they were straight because if they wanted to run a deer or a coyote they would have already had one jumped. We went about 3 miles and his dogs started getting busy with their head down, tails wagging. They trailed that cat for about 20 minutes and jumped. after about 20 minutes Harold said it was about time for that cat to start pulling some tricks and sure enough the dogs made a lose. About 2 minutes later they had him up and going again and caught him on the ground after about 45 ore minutes. We walked into them and they had about a 20# cat. Harold told the dogs to heel and everyone of them got behind him and followed him to the truck. He put the tailgate down and they all loaded up without him putting a hand on them. I thought if he can do that with running walkers, I can   do that with Plotts. After that all my older dogs have that kind of handle.
  2nd hunt was a carbon copy of the first and even jumped the cat in the same area. We saw this cat 3 times and Harold said he would go about 30#. After 2 hours or so the cat headed out and was headed to the highway. Harold said he hated to do it but he had to break up the race and catch the dogs before they hit the highway. He started blowing his horn and 9 hounds broke off a hot cat race and came straight to the truck. I was impressed again at the control he had over his dogs so I started working on mine. lol
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« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2019, 06:39:20 pm »

Goose, I was talking about Frankie Wheat and Robert Lee Hopgood.  Charlie Gainse and I used to hunt with him a good bit back about 35 years or so. Quick funny story, We were hunting a cornfield with Robert Lee and hogs had been there sometime during the evening before and after about 1/2 hour of the dogs milling around I heard Dawg baying. He must have been about 3/4 of a mile and we went in and caught about a 175# boar. Robert Lee asks me if he thought Dawg had trailed him out of the cornfield and I replied. Well Rob, if it was one of your dogs out there baying and we had fresh hog sign in the field here, dont you think he trailed it out of the cornfield. Rob said point taken. lol He didnt like it tho when someones dogs out did his and he had good dogs. Dawg just had that ability to make good dogs look bad.

I wasn’t very clear, my apology, I meant to ask who were the guys you got Dawg from, ole Frankie is a card and definitely one of a kind local living legend type, he’s loved and hated, I don’t think there’s a man alive whose caught more hogs on the pearl river than him, albeit he was usually slipping at night, had a corn pile on somebody else land and also knew every high ridge in the swamp when the river got high he went into hog mode, he might not have always done things the right way in life but will forever have my respect, he was the only hog hunter who would let me tag along when I was young and paw paw and my uncles had all but hung it up and I had no one to go with, all through little league he was involved a lot and made sure every kid was tended to and had a ride to and from practice and games no matter their skin color, he used to let me come stay the night with him to go hunting the next morning, my mother used to bring me and my dogs in her van and drop me off over there, I stopped in town to talk to Francis last Friday and he came rolling up on us, me and Rob became friends several years before he passed and became close, no matter if I had cattle to sell or not I was at the sale barn every Tuesday to sit with him and talk dogs and learn his ways and reasons cattle buying and farming, he was a country boy who worked the land his entire life and carved out a great living for him and his entire family off his farm, he was a pretty brilliant individual and for whatever reason took a liking to me and bought me an old mason bred male to breed from up north MS, I really do miss him and our conversations, years ago Rob was wanting more of a challenge hog hunting and bought several pure Russian boars and bred them to local sows, years after he was to old to hunt he told me that was a HUGE mistake because he got way more challenge than he anticipated...
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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2019, 06:49:39 pm »

The guy I got Dawg from was Sal Smith out of Abita Springs. Him and his Dad used to hunt the Piney woods from Abita to Pearl River. They were about done when I met sal. Butch and Jack Strain used to have some of the same dogs and they ran cattle in the same woods.  The guy Robert Lee got the Russian hogs from came from me. I sold them to a young guy up around Rob's and I think he went thru a divorse and robert Lee bought them.
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2019, 07:04:12 pm »

The guy I got Dawg from was Sal Smith out of Abita Springs. Him and his Dad used to hunt the Piney woods from Abita to Pearl River. They were about done when I met sal. Butch and Jack Strain used to have some of the same dogs and they ran cattle in the same woods.  The guy Robert Lee got the Russian hogs from came from me. I sold them to a young guy up around Rob's and I think he went thru a divorse and robert Lee bought them.


Although there’s a lot of Smith’s on up toward poplarville and pearl river county I’m just about will to bet it all that they’re going to be kin to the smiths that live in southern pearl river county which is just across state line from Pearl River La, they were and are cow hands and have had some really nice cow dogs over the years, the old man Mr. Bloss Smith knew how to breed dogs, that’s not far at all as the crow flies from the Smiths you knew, to much coincidence in their occupations, lifestyle and dog type, I’ll ask paw in law if he knew them...
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2019, 07:38:14 pm »

I met Finney Clay once about 20 years ago. Harold got a lot of dogs from him. He was cat hunting with an old guy from south texas. We were hunting the same places then. I wish I knew back then how good his dogs were supposed to be. I would of talked to him more about them! Lol

Cajun! I have hunted with Harold twice and he showed me a cat each time. First time he came over and we went behind the house and he dumped 1/2 dozen or so running walkers out and I am having mental nightmares about chasing these dogs all over the club. They got ahead of the truck and by the time we roaded them a mile, I knew they were straight because if they wanted to run a deer or a coyote they would have already had one jumped. We went about 3 miles and his dogs started getting busy with their head down, tails wagging. They trailed that cat for about 20 minutes and jumped. after about 20 minutes Harold said it was about time for that cat to start pulling some tricks and sure enough the dogs made a lose. About 2 minutes later they had him up and going again and caught him on the ground after about 45 ore minutes. We walked into them and they had about a 20# cat. Harold told the dogs to heel and everyone of them got behind him and followed him to the truck. He put the tailgate down and they all loaded up without him putting a hand on them. I thought if he can do that with running walkers, I can   do that with Plotts. After that all my older dogs have that kind of handle.
  2nd hunt was a carbon copy of the first and even jumped the cat in the same area. We saw this cat 3 times and Harold said he would go about 30#. After 2 hours or so the cat headed out and was headed to the highway. Harold said he hated to do it but he had to break up the race and catch the dogs before they hit the highway. He started blowing his horn and 9 hounds broke off a hot cat race and came straight to the truck. I was impressed again at the control he had over his dogs so I started working on mine. lol

I’ve haven’t had the chance to check off the bucket list of going cat hunting with him, as the street saying goes “ real recognizes real”, I have had the pleasure on several occasions to watch him control about 20 man eating kelpies and 600 head of 7-8 weight yearlings all while sitting in his truck  with about 3 different tri tronics  units giving commands to each dog and honking his horn and backing up slowly to the pen set up as they slowly brought the cattle into
The pens I was awe struck and knew then he was the real deal, anyone but him  even so much as looked at that box full of kelpies was getting bit but him, although he was watchful when opening the dog box after dang near all them bailed up on tail gate and he never had to put a hand on the first one, I too as well thought to myself that if he was able to have dogs handling like that than after some time I could...
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2019, 07:45:49 pm »

The dogs we hunt are from local catahoula stock that been bred raised in North Louisiana for long time got couple older fellows dogs come from one of them crossed a cur on plott gyp and had good luck with it so though the years he has done it several times with good results I took a gyp from a cross from him I raised and bred her to line bred full cur from different family of dogs that has a lot of hunt and bottom I got 6 puppies that just made 6 months out that cross ready to see what they going to make this winter

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« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2019, 10:20:05 am »

Mostly because they were free or I already I had them. The ones I bought when I first started were someone else’s trash. After I cleared through the bs it was just me possum and chief two dogs I owned before I started hunting. The other 3 or 4 were just there. Then I saw where a man locally was giving away his redbone that he had labeled as a help dog that stayed behind his lead dog so I was like maybe he learned a thing or two following and lead dog. And boy he did I guess he was a me too dog until he no one to lead the way. While I was there picking him up he also gave me his son that had never been started he’s turning out quite nice too. His son will put teeth on one but he will not. Possum on the other hand is pretty tight. Chief has been a rcd or lead in. My friend down the road let me pay off his cur which is really nice he’s a tad loose but I like that. A few months later the man that gave me the redbone and his son wanted me to keep his lead dog in shape and he also lended me a strike vest a tracking collar and shock system to keep him in check. Now I have a pretty decent pack we don’t always find hogs but we sometimes stumble upon one and give it hell lol. I’m figuring them out more and more each time we hunt. I bred my cur to my Favorite pit I have and hopefully will come up with a little more rougher dog than he with just as much hunt and good nose crossing my fingers. May breed back to a hound or another cur
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« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2019, 04:14:05 pm »

I think this is probably more directed to people that have been in this sport for quite some time, but I’ll chime in. My current pack consists of the following; Dum Dum, my lead strike dog, he is game pit x to Ladner BMC. His mom was a RCD and the Dad was an extremely long range, soft baying, open BMC. He was cold nosed and wouldn’t quit a track until he had a pig. Way more bottom than most people (myself included) would want in a dog. Dum Dum hunts out between 200-300yds until he strikes a track, and then will go a little over a mile. If it’s not stopped by then he’s coming back. He’s silent and straight catch. I also have his littermate, a female named Mine. I got them both already started from by buddy Donnie. I got him when he was a year old and got her about 5-6 months later. She hunts about the same, just doesn’t take lead. The next dog is Mines daughter, the father is my catch dogs brother. This female named Punk hasn’t found her own yet but she’s in the races and is silent and straight catch. She’s small but dear lord she will tear a pigs face off and she’s only about a year and a half old. She’s gonna be a really good dog I believe. Then I have my catch dog who was just my house pet bull dog until I started hunting. The other dog is my BMC scooter, he’s about 2.5 years old but hasn’t been hunted much because I only have 4 tracking collars and he’s open. I think he’s gonna be like his dad (who is the father of Dum Dum and Mine). And last but not least I have two young dogs from Justin Corbell that should be really good. They’re about ready to start and will change my style of hunting if they turn out like their parents. More cast style dogs opposed to all my dogs that I walk hunt.


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« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2019, 04:56:51 pm »

Autesus, this is meant for everyone. I can learn and get new ideas from the greenest of green. I love to hear about other people's dogs and love to hear the pride people have about them.

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