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Author Topic: 1 Bay Dog, 1 Catch Dog + Bushy Terrain  (Read 302 times)
Shotgun66
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« on: February 14, 2020, 01:03:46 pm »

I’m lookin for a sanity check here. I’ve singled  out a nice find/bay dog. He’s been doing his part to find and bay hogs consistently. I hunt in North Central Texas in some thick, brushy, cedar and briar invested country. The bay dogs I hunt are loose bay dogs ( my choice) They don’t put teeth on hogs at all. I realize they do not help my catch dogs on a break/busted bay. They will relocate and bark but will not catch. I catch consistently when I hunt both bay dogs and both catch dogs. I find & bay consistently when I hunt 1 bay dog. I do not catch consistently hunting 1 bay dog.
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Poll Question...... do you feel like your bay dogs have to help catch on a break/busted bay? Im coming to that conclusion in my hunting situation. I’ve owned and hunted with some catchy curs that would find and catch off a break/busted bay. Thinking I might need a pair of them instead of a pair of catch dogs.
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Just looking for feedback & opinions based on experience. Thanks in advance.



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Leon Keys
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2020, 02:01:06 pm »

For the record, I’m getting between 50 and 100 yards from bay before cutting the catch dog. Do my best to not get winded by the hogs. Also try to give the catch dog the best path available to the bay. I wait until the bay dog is really singing before turning the catch dog to em. Look at the Garmin and the hogs will normally break as soon as they hear brush cracking a little before the catch dog arrives. If the bay dog bays close and quick, the catch dog covers and catches. If it takes more than a couple hundred yards, I have the catch dog toned in and back on the leash. The hogs are obviously educated. I typically catch mature boars that just don’t want to run when using this approach.


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Leon Keys
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2020, 05:52:37 pm »

Man... it’s real hard to get a catch dog to a hog in thick brush with only 1 dog baying it. At least that’s my option and what I’ve experienced over the years. I like to have several dogs in there baying keeping the hogs attention... especially in thick palmettos haha.
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Slim9797
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2020, 07:10:48 pm »

This is why I always liked bulldogs that don’t go full freight train into a bay. A bulldog that will work to a bay and pick his shot, is a needle in a haystack, but the few I’ve seen, didn’t miss often, no matter how many or what was baying that hog. Personally when I was using a catchdog and only 1 bay dog, which I was quite often over about a year period, I put eyes on the hog before ever sending the bulldog, but that bay dog was a good bitch and certainly would help catch. Is this bay dog a front end dog? Biggest thing In my opinion as far as using 1 or 2 bay dogs, is a lot just want to st d there and face bark. All the hog has to do is turn and run. A dog that will actually work a hog, and really bay, rather than just bark, in my opinion, has a better shot at keeping hogs bayed one out, especially when brush starts crashing from a catch dog on his way.


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« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2020, 09:13:11 pm »

I try to always have either 2 bay dogs that would put their mouth on one and 1 catchdog or 2 catch dogs and 1 bay dog. It's nice to have a dog on both ears on a bigger hog in my opinion....personal preference I reckon.

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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2020, 04:55:17 am »

If it’s super thick, I like to have 2-3 bay dogs baying. With just one dog it seems the bulldog busting through brush is a lot more noticeable and the hogs tend to break a lot more. With that said, I’ve bayed more really big hogs with just one dog, they just seem to stand for one dog a whole lot better right off the bat. It’s hard to train young dogs like that, so I’ve gotten away from it. I like to hear a good bay with a few cur dogs roaring on one.

It always helps if the cur dogs help catch when the catch dogs hit, but that’s usually when the cur dogs get whacked.  Loose or gritty, the hog has gotta want to stay bayed, if he decides to run, he’s gonna run.
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NLAhunter
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2020, 06:50:06 am »

Over here in the small pines full of briars I like to have 3 dogs baying before sending bulldog but I have bayed lot big hogs with one loose baying dog it's hard for bulldog to get though these thickets without making much noise I like to get with in 50 yards before turning em loose and get closer that that if it's in spot I can but if hog wants to run he is going to brake and run and it ain't much no kinda dog can do about it that I have seen in grown up pine plantation full of briars

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Shotgun66
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« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2020, 08:46:04 am »

Appreciate the responses and sharing your experiences fellas. After tippin my cap to the hogs a few times lately, I needed to reassess my approach. Truth is these hogs have found an advantage and are using it effectively to beat us and survive. My catch rate increases significantly when I run 2 bay dogs and 2 catch dogs. It goes up even more when I have a third bay dog and an extra hunting partner to manage the other catch dog and attack a bay from opposite sides. I walk hunt alone most of the time and ain’t getting any younger. I was hoping to just hunt 1 bay & 1 catch to make it easier & a little more enjoyable. Gotta face reality.....it ain’t gonna work consistently where I hunt with the dogs I’m hunting.
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On the bright side, it’s been fun to watch the bay dog mature and evolve into a nice dog that can get hogs bayed alone or in company. Pic of him on a good result below.


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Leon Keys
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« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2020, 08:48:07 am »

Bay dog as goofy 3 month old pup.....


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Leon Keys
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2020, 09:01:29 am »

This is why I always liked bulldogs that don’t go full freight train into a bay. A bulldog that will work to a bay and pick his shot, is a needle in a haystack, but the few I’ve seen, didn’t miss often, no matter how many or what was baying that hog. Personally when I was using a catchdog and only 1 bay dog, which I was quite often over about a year period, I put eyes on the hog before ever sending the bulldog, but that bay dog was a good bitch and certainly would help catch. Is this bay dog a front end dog? Biggest thing In my opinion as far as using 1 or 2 bay dogs, is a lot just want to st d there and face bark. All the hog has to do is turn and run. A dog that will actually work a hog, and really bay, rather than just bark, in my opinion, has a better shot at keeping hogs bayed one out, especially when brush starts crashing from a catch dog on his way.


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Slim.....the bay dog is a front end, slash & circle style bay dog. He is 100% loose baying and will not put himself in a bad spot alone. When he has room to operate, he will get to the front and do his best to get and keep one’s attention. He will turn, give ground and get back in front of a big hog charges him. He even faces up and backs up facing the hog when he has room to operate. I’ve discouraged him from catching shoats which has probably removed the little grit he had naturally. The places we are baying these hogs is just too thick for a single bay dog to tighten up and control a hog.
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I’ve moved to pure loose, finesse style bay dogs after pouring my heart and soul into a couple tight baying, gritty bay dogs only to have them get killed around 4 years old when they were just finishing into nice dogs. I’m at a point where I’d rather get beat than lose a bay dog. This is just the price I pay for running too few of the type of dog I like.


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Leon Keys
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« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2020, 09:01:59 am »

This is why I always liked bulldogs that don’t go full freight train into a bay. A bulldog that will work to a bay and pick his shot, is a needle in a haystack, but the few I’ve seen, didn’t miss often, no matter how many or what was baying that hog. Personally when I was using a catchdog and only 1 bay dog, which I was quite often over about a year period, I put eyes on the hog before ever sending the bulldog, but that bay dog was a good bitch and certainly would help catch. Is this bay dog a front end dog? Biggest thing In my opinion as far as using 1 or 2 bay dogs, is a lot just want to st d there and face bark. All the hog has to do is turn and run. A dog that will actually work a hog, and really bay, rather than just bark, in my opinion, has a better shot at keeping hogs bayed one out, especially when brush starts crashing from a catch dog on his way.


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Slim.....the bay dog is a front end, slash & circle style bay dog. He is 100% loose baying and will not put himself in a bad spot alone. When he has room to operate, he will get to the front and do his best to get and keep one’s attention. He will turn, give ground and get back in front of a big hog charges him. He even faces up and backs up facing the hog when he has room to operate. I’ve discouraged him from catching shoats which has probably removed the little grit he had naturally. The places we are baying these hogs is just too thick for a single bay dog to tighten up and control a hog.
-
I’ve moved to pure loose, finesse style bay dogs after pouring my heart and soul into a couple tight baying, gritty bay dogs only to have them get killed around 4 years old when they were just finishing into nice dogs. I’m at a point where I’d rather get beat than lose a bay dog. This is just the price I pay for running too few of the type of dog I like.


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Leon Keys
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Shotgun66
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2020, 09:02:42 am »

This is why I always liked bulldogs that don’t go full freight train into a bay. A bulldog that will work to a bay and pick his shot, is a needle in a haystack, but the few I’ve seen, didn’t miss often, no matter how many or what was baying that hog. Personally when I was using a catchdog and only 1 bay dog, which I was quite often over about a year period, I put eyes on the hog before ever sending the bulldog, but that bay dog was a good bitch and certainly would help catch. Is this bay dog a front end dog? Biggest thing In my opinion as far as using 1 or 2 bay dogs, is a lot just want to st d there and face bark. All the hog has to do is turn and run. A dog that will actually work a hog, and really bay, rather than just bark, in my opinion, has a better shot at keeping hogs bayed one out, especially when brush starts crashing from a catch dog on his way.


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Slim.....the bay dog is a front end, slash & circle style bay dog. He is 100% loose baying and will not put himself in a bad spot alone. When he has room to operate, he will get to the front and do his best to get and keep one’s attention. He will turn, give ground and get back in front of a big hog charges him. He even faces up and backs up facing the hog when he has room to operate. I’ve discouraged him from catching shoats which has probably removed the little grit he had naturally. The places we are baying these hogs is just too thick for a single bay dog to tighten up and control a hog.
-
I’ve moved to pure loose, finesse style bay dogs after pouring my heart and soul into a couple tight baying, gritty bay dogs only to have them get killed around 4 years old when they were just finishing into nice dogs. I’m at a point where I’d rather get beat than lose a bay dog. This is just the price I pay for running too few of the type of dog I like.


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Leon Keys
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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2020, 11:11:41 am »

I like one and one but I usually do two and one or two and two for that reason. In more open areas 1 and ain’t to bad of a choice. But in those thick spot a hog is the better athlete by far. If you can handle the extra dog I would go one loose dog two bulldogs or a rough cur to turn out with the cd


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warrent423
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« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2020, 06:06:54 pm »

2 rough cur dogs that will bay a hog till you get there and then catch when told, no matter terrain. Bulldogs not needed. Problem solved. Wink
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